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-rights laws that prohibit firing, promoting and hiring based on race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those immutable characteristics that we think are worthy of the protection of our civil rights laws. in most states there are modest exemptions to the employment at will dadoctrine, amount wrongful discharge. when an employer requires someone to break the law in order to keep their job. or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of a well-defined written public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wi de latitude, because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person that takes the risk and set up a business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their business the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. again, this is a small one. not saying that you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified for your job. in essence, what these laws do rainout are saving employers from themselves, because if they are ignoring all of the unem
in the classrooms, particularly say on the subject of religion? >> well, in the hearing, i asked the question about a less on on islam that was sent to me by an enterprising parent and let me share this with you, alisyn, it was parents doing their homework and trying to get information that brought this to our committee's attention and so they found this lesson on islam and in texas we do teach all religions and students should learn about all religions, parents, i found it odd a full lesson on islam and not equal on christianity or any other religion. in the last segment, the answer was we changed that and that's not the program now and that's the danger of online learning, online learning is the future and it's terrific that, that's how students learn. if they're learning history and see the name patrick henry and it's linked to patrick henry, they can go in areas they can never go in a textbook. >> that's the wave of the future, so, how can you be sure of what the kids in texas and across the country are going to be taught. how can you change this curriculum now? >> yes. >> well, we're going to
or the value of religion and i do think that's one of the reasons why president obama continues the tradition going his fifth he year here. there's something religiously for politicians it's a common language, trying to bridge the gap between themselves and a number of americans. we've heard president obama do that in past years in very real terms. we've learned things about him. last year we learned that he prays every day. he said he gets up in the morning, says a brief prayer and spends some time in scripture and devotion and obviously talking i think a lot in evangelical tones at the time you look at it in this event that, yes, it's not supposed to be a political event, but it was in an election year where a number of normally, i would say evangelical republican supporters had questions about mitt romney and you saw president obama maybe able to seize this moment, so i think sometimes it serves a political opportunity. sometimes it serves this sort of, serves as an opportunity for the president to reach out, and certainly at a time right now when he's dealing with some very divisive issue
's great religions. it is a feast for the eyes and millions of pilgrims have already arrived. a sea of humanity on india's ganges river. we've waited 12 years for this festival to come around again so we sent holly williams to witness the spectacle. >> reporter: from every corner of india and by every conceivable mode of transport pilgrims are making their way to prayag, the holiest place in the hindu world for the biggest celebration on the hindu calendar the maha kumbh mela held only once every 12 years. born by their shared faith, they come here to purify themselves by bathing in the ganges the river that nurtured india's 5 civilization. om kumar is a wheat farmer from central india who told us he walked 300 miles to get here. why did you come from so far away? he made the journey, he said because the water has special power. for hindus the ganges suzuki a sacred river and they believe that bathing here during the kumbh mela will wash away their signs. the pilgrims have set up camp in a sprawling city of tents complete with banks, its own police force and traffic jams. but on sun
, religion, etc. discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, it started to have its own life. the ability of a president to name something -- i'm jumping ahead a little bit. but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. it was from day one in this country the president in the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these testimonies which were sort of created by presidents, we think, are there from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term first lady. that did not exist. he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was keep the ball rolling. i'm jumping around a little bit, but it's sort of fun. woodrow wilson had
about history, religion, politics. >> you don't love your child any less because they have a mental illness. you love them probably more. sometimes i think elliot was put here on earth for us just to see if we could make it through. >> i'm a good person. >> smart. >> smart and talented. >> beat dad on jeopardy. >> usually beat dad on jeopardy. >> a lot of memories in those books. >> misdiagnosed with add as a first grader. it took years for elliot to get the correct diagnosis. asasberger's syndrome. often repetitive behaviors. he also has a mental illness. psychosis, a loss of contact with reality. >> he actually went out to a dumpster, they were building a new home, and started banging his head on the dumpster. if that doesn't break your heart, i don't know what does. to see someone go through that and now to look at elliot. >> i was delusional. >> you were delusional, but you're doing so good now. >> there were years of heartbreak and struggle. he head butted his father and the family was forced to call 911. >> elliot was thrown to the ground by a police officer, shack
, immigration he said there's room but, look, republicans need to get religion on this. do you expect a similar tone in the state of the union? >> he has a limited amount of time. they feel they have a so-called m mandate from their victory not losing the senate. i think it's kind of full speed ahead for the president right now. he's going to go as bold as he can go, limited amount of time. i think i disagree a little bit on the economy. i think it's a course correction for him. i feel he's maybe second-guessing, not talking about the economy during his inaugural speech, now maybe i should have talked about that. >> which is fascinating because if you look at the first term in a lot of ways, you know, he started off -- you had a republican party that was largely kind of in the doldrums and he started off with economic stimulus and health care which united the party in some way. is he -- is he smart to refocus on the economy, jim? >> yes. >> and probably the more important question, is there actually -- we had angus king on saying there's common ground. is there common ground on big things? >> y
's been cloaked in secrecy and secrecy is the sacrosanct secular religion of this city. >> woodruff: so this has stirred it up? >> i think so, because of the leaked memo and the system, we are having a debate about drones. and i guess if i want a drone policy i want it run by a franciscan, not a jesuit. but he didn't really defend it, even, though. he didn't really go out there and say here is why we have to do it he saw the chairman of the committee senator feinstein try to brag an argument out of him. he was hesitant to go there because he wanted to add leer to secrecy. but because of the memo we're having the discussion. and it's being lead on the other side by the opponents ron and j rockefeller, people like that and so you know when i look at the evidence, one of the things you see is that people like barack obama who were opposed more or less are skeptical of the policy, once they are actually in in power faced with the realities you see them swing over and so it's become a f you think about if we are going to take on al qaeda, and i think the evidence is that it allows you to kil
. the state has become the major religion in this country. the icons in washington -- they have to destroy every aspect of people who hold to a higher moral authority. host: the headline in this morning "the wall street journal" -- castle in michigan, on our lands for democrats. -- ethel in michigan, on our line for democrats. caller: my question is, what happened between the separation between church and state? i believe this is more of a legal issue than a religious issue. the religious issue is for the contraceptive. i can understand that. why is this being mixed in with state issues? he did not have to take them if you do not want them, if you do not believe in them. don't use them. i just cannot understand why this does not go away. i am really quite tired of it all. thank you. host: more from the article in this morning's "the wall street journal." they write -- the new rules would require insurers to pay the up-front cost. our next call comes from carol in ohio, on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. i am totally against what the catholic church and republicans are doing a
as you would have them do unto you. all cultures and races and religions. >> is that him. >> he is not in the painting. that is a farmer that was a end from of his in vermont where he lived at the time. >> who is this over here. >> one of my favorites. you can almost taste the turkey. >> quintessential thanksgiving piece. done for a very serious purpose during world war ii to articulate president roosevelts four freedoms. freedom of speech, freedom from want. fear dom from fear and freedom to worship. these are the reasons america went into war to preserve these freedoms for people all over the world. >> he also made statements too, look at this. >> after he stopped working for the saturday evening post where he had done 321 magazine covers through the his lifetime went to work for look magazine. the subject matter changed greatly and he he started painting the current events of the day and did some very important civil rights movement paintings. this young girl is walking to school will protected by the u.s. marshals i want indicating the first elementary school in new orleans.
the organization that it is religious and they want their employees to be similar religion. >> gregg: and they have every right. >> it's called the ministerial exception. it's in case law. it's exactly on point. if you are religious entity and focus is on that, there is a standard. they can make selections and appointments with hiring that are the same religious ilk. >> forprofit and nonprofit and you bring in the fair employment housing act. >> gregg: that is good point. by the way, that supreme court decision that we cited, due drew distinction forprofit and not. >> they are saying it's partially not for profit. this school says it is for profit, but i think that the court is going to still be the ministerial exception rule not for not for profits. >> gregg: if there is anybody that is performing a ministerial duty isn't it the teacher in the classroom, it's not the janitor. >> exactly right. >> that is the distinction in the supreme court case. >> gregg: ministerial distinction prevails. >> the ministers and teachers and not ministers. so it doesn't necessarily prevail. second of all, a minister
, specifically our melting pot of diversity. in five americans say they follow no religion at all. in today's i am america, carol costello look at the reasons why. >> here's a riddle. what do comedian kathy griffin and julianne moore and mark zuckerberg have in common in. >> hopefully one of america's most famous atheists. >> they are among those who do not believe god exists that. puts atheists around 5%. according to the pew study, one in five people claim they have no religious affiliation at all. why? the answers vary. there is a very activist atheist movement under way getting the message out on social media. take these facebook pages, for example. each has hundreds of thousands of likes. activist atheists have taken to you tube. ian evangelicals who tried to put the blame on godless schools for the newtown massacre. >> god didn't save the kids because he is not allowed in school. all of a sudden god respects the law of man. >> a massive crowd braved the cold for what was billed as the reason rally. >> i am here for the children in texas and other states who are being told lies about histo
together who did not usually come together. we were not bounded in a common race or religion. we are not a theocracy. we are not a minority. this nation was born with the ideals that a united people, but these ideals compel every generation to be more inclusive and welcoming. we realize this country was not a zero some political nation. in fact, the more we open up this country to inclusion, the better we are. women joining the work force has not diminished men. it expands our economy and opportunity for all. the education of poor people in the inner-city does not take away from others, it expands our economy and makes us all do better. this is the ideal of our country. as the rabbi would tell me, the jewish saying, that jews together are strong, but jews with other people are invincible. he african saying that spiderwebs united can tie up a line. the very principle of this country, one of my advisers told me one of the fundamental principles of islam. the oneness of the community. we recognize dependency and see strength. that became the problem solving idea that i took on. i be
on the stand, all the talk of sex and religion. what is going on? >> two tracks here. they're trying to show travis alexander the victim in this case as a sexual deviant. this is a mormon community, could be there are mormons, also people that have conservative views on that jury, and so they're trying to appeal to those people on that jury. not only that, they're trying to show he had control over her. and that's the domestic violence part of this. self-defense, she's got to prove that in that moment, she says travis, she dropped travis alexander, this is a year or so after what we're seeing now. she drops his camera, travis alexander comes at her, she has to use deadly force, extreme deadly force on him. all of that is couched in the idea she was in this alexander and she was in a domestically violent relationship. and then they will have an expert on to say that she was a battered woman. >> cross-examination is going to be interesting. ryan smith, is sunny hostin, my thanks to both of you. make sure you check ryan on hln's "evening express" at 5:00 p.m. eastern. >>> we're getting word fr
pot of diversity. might surprise you that one in five americans now say they follow no religion at all. in today's i am america piece we look at the reasons why. here is a riddle what to comedian kathy griffin, julian moore and mark zuckerberg have in common. >> i am hopefully a famous atheist. >> they join bill mar in saying they do not believe god exists. various surveys put the number of atheists at 5%. according to a study in 2012, one in five people claim they have no religious affiliation at all. but why? the answers vary. one reason perhaps is that the word religious is no longer necessarily associated with being a good person. then there's a very activist atheist movement underway. getting its message out not in the mainstream media. but on social media. take these facebook pages, for example. each has hundreds of thousands of likes as atheists challenge critics on any number of news items and social issues. activist atheists have taken to youtube with huge audiences following. meet amazing atheist guy, that's what he calls himself. here he is rallying against christian evangel
that have? >> they're trying to say he was controlling her sexually and through religion. the question about the impact depends on whether the jurors believe her. it becomes really important exactly how she's describing it. she seems nervous at times. she's trying to seem uncomfortable. if the jurors don't believe that reaction, that's a big problem. if the jurors do believe that, that's entirely helpful. so, while we talk about the graphic nature and the salacious nature of the testimony, actually, the way she's responding to it becomes even more important. >> all right. there will be much, much more to tell. >> the cross-examination is still coming, next week. >> dan abrams, thank you very much. >>> time, now, for the weather. and sam champion, a lot to talk about, too, sam. >> we also have some fog that was -- yesterday, we had so much of the country with heavy fog. oklahoma city was one of those areas. yesterday, at the zero visibility point, a good part of the country. today, we're looking at more like a quarter-mile in that region. we have the warm temperatures. the long nights this ti
at the washington hilton for the official start of the national prayer breakfast. our religion correspondent lauren green live in our washington bureau. any big announcements this morning, lauren? >> reporter: jon, one surprise to many people, except the white house inner circle was the president's announcement his long time faith advisor would be leaving his post tomorrow. dubois is a young ministers whose face was not known to people outside of religious groups. he headed the president's faith based office. was buy by his side during the campaign and first term. dubois is known as the president's personal faith advisor. >> every morning he sends me, via e-mail, a daily meditation, a snippet of scripture, for me to reflect on, and it is meant the world to me and despite my pleas, tomorrow will be his last day in the white house. >> reporter: the president made no mention why dubois is leaving. not uncommon in second term for staff to do so. my sources say the white house will announce tomorrow where dubois is headed, jon? jon: did the president touch on policy at all in this breakfast? >> reporter
they are getting religion. in fact, now it's allowing us to have a discussion where there is an acknowledgement of how much has gone into boarder security. that will be a continuing efforts, but there is a huge political, again, economic add vantsage to us if we have a sensible immigration policy with the path to citizenship. the folks who are here many of them have been working. we can get them to be out in the open rather than in the shadows and and they are taxpayers and many of them are very talented. it's going to allow families to be together and probably so i think there is a lot of interest here on the democratic side in a growing awareness on the republican side somehow same way we have to address this in a substantial way. >> wait one other issue congressman. the new york sometimes is reporting that you have introduced legislation dealing with a special benefit sort of that was given one california pharmaceutical company understand obamacare that you are trying to get rid of? >> slipped in, in the fiscal cliff negotiations at the 11th hour. over on the se
has many different parts. you can talk about economics, politics, religion, intellectual history, military history. but we can also talk about social history: race, class and gender are tops on that list. >>steve: so you looked at these two universities down in texas -- by the way, why did you pick texas and those two schools? >> texas handed us the opportunity. in 1971 it passed a law saying students had to take a europe american history and then in 2009 passed another law saying that the universities had to make the syllabi of their courses publicly available within three clicks of their main page. >>steve: so you could do investigating on your own. you did this study and you determined the instructors there are placing an awful lot of emphasis on race, class and gender. why? >> why? we think that is because they have been trained to do that, that the students coming out of the graduate schools in overwhelming numbers specialize in those areas, and also because they think they're doing good. they think that there is something wrong with america that needs to be fixed, and one
of rights. free interests of religion is what is under attack here. all it does is put regulatory language what was proposed a year ago by the administration as a so-called compromise. it is not. it's a farce. it's an accounting trick. catholic university, for example, is compelled by the state under obama care to offer health insurance and the health insurer is compelled by the state to provide coverage of contraceptives. the cost obviously is going to be shifted back to catholic university and its students. simple police officer a gimmick. the worst part how you define worship. churches you worship on sunday are completely exempt because that would be outrage. the secularists at the department of h.h.s. religious only the place where you go on sunday. only a place where you worship god. but if you are a catholic soup kitchen, where you are doing god's work, that's not considered religious. that from and of itself is an outrage. >> the crux of this is that nonprofits hobby horse. >> hobby lobby? >> the craft store. >> the cavity craft store which they are not part of this provision as wel
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)